Training & Development

Sailing is not difficult and once learnt, like riding a bike, you never forget.  If you have not sailed before and would like to learn, you can come and crew.

Many of our members sail two handed boats and there is always a need for crews, so by making this your first step it will ensure you get on the water from day one.

DuncanSailingSmallWe have a couple of training boats that you can also try out, once you have tried crewing. You can contact Duncan our Development Officer , who is a fully qualified instructor and will be happy to help show you the ropes. We have an Open Day on June 28th and will then be running regular Newcomer and Improver Sessions on Saturday mornings at 11am, starting in July.
There are also opportunities to crew for experienced members in club racing. The three main classes raced at the Club are Merlin Rockets, Enterprises and GPs, all of which go well on the River and can be obtained cheaply secondhand.

Getting Started: For your first trip on the water, you may get at least damp so bring a change of clothes, not forgetting dry underwear & footwear. Whilst on the water its best to wear comfortable layers and avoid jeans which hold the water meaning that you will rapidly chill in the wind. On cooler days gloves, scarf and a hat are useful. If rain threatens a waterproof top is recommended (and trousers you have them). Footwear should provide grip and be prepared to get wet.  Some members wear high tech breathable gear, dinghy boots and even wetsuits but investment in these is not necessary for the river. Buoyancy aids can be borrowed from the Club as we have a range to suit all ages and sizes.

Boat ownership is a lifestyle decision and your choice of craft will depend on several factors. Do you have children or a partner who will join you as regular crew or are you most likely to be on your own? Solo’s are popular for single-handed sailing, whilst GPs & Enterprises which need two people suit couples, a parent with an older child or friends.
Buying a boat need not be expensive, second hand dinghies or canoes can cost a little as a few hundred pounds and even a new one can cost less than you think. Which class do you want to sail in? Do you want to become a vintage dinghy owner, would you prefer something high-tech with lots of string to tweak or would a second-hand anything-that-floats suit your style? Will you want to sail elsewhere, in which case you will need a tow-bar and a trailer? Club members are more than willing to advise on what sorts of boats fit best with our stretch of the river and also will look over any potential purchase with you if needed.